Edit & Opinion

Will London-Tokyo team up to fill Huawei 5G void?

Introduction

In January 2020, the UK had given a go-ahead to Chinese telecom giant Huawei to participate in its 5G network – with restrictions and conditions. Trump conveyed his displeasure to the Boris Johnson Administration. Not just him, but the senior officials of the US administration had warned that this decision would impact economic and security relations between the UK and US.

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In the aftermath of the COVID 19 pandemic, ties between the UK and China have steadily deteriorated. As a result of increasing strains with Beijing, and the imposition of strong US sanctions against Huawei, the UK began to rethink its approach towards Huawei’s role in its 5G network.

First, it was decided that Huawei’s participation would be reduced to zero by 2023.  In May, Britain had also proposed a grouping of D10 (G7+ India, South Korea and Australia) which could work collectively for reducing dependence upon Chinese technologies.

UK-China ties after the imposition of the National Security Law in Hong Kong

The UK further hardened its stance vis-à-vis China after the imposition of the National Security Law in Hong Kong, which according to the UK is a violation of the ‘one country two systems’ arrangement safeguarded by the ‘Basic law’ of Hong Kong, and the Sino-British joint declaration signed in 1985. According to the Boris Johnson Administration, the National Security Law will impinge upon not just the autonomy of Hong Kong, but freedoms and rights of the residents of the former British colony, guaranteed by the 1985 declaration (these rights were to remain in place for a period of fifty years from 1997 – the year in which British left Hong Kong and handed over sovereignty to China).

Decision regarding Huawei

On July 14, 2020, on the recommendation of National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) the Boris Johnson Administration decided that Huawei will be removed from the 5G network by 2027. It was also decided, that the purchase of 5G kits from Huawei will not be allowed after the end of December 2020.

 


Also Read: China-Britain’s worsening feud


 

China reacted strongly to UK’s recent announcement, while it was welcomed by US President Donald Trump. While China stated that UK’s decision will exacerbate tensions, the US President stated that the Johnson Administration took this decision as a result of pressure from Washington. A top official in Boris Johnson’s administration stated that this decision was not driven by US pressure.

Said the British Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab: “But I think that decision was made not because the US said it was a good decision but because the leadership in the UK concluded the right thing to do was to make that decision for the people of the UK.”

Interestingly, some media reports suggest, that British officials have stated that the recent ban on Huawei was imposed with a view to placate Trump, and the UK could revise its decision, if the mercurial US President is voted out in November 2020.

UK– Japan relations

Britain has already begun to look for alternatives to Huawei for developing its 5G network. On July 16, 2020 two days after the decision was taken to remove the Chinese telecom giant altogether by 2027, British officials are supposed to have met with their Japanese counterparts, and sought assistance for developing Britain’s 5G network. Two companies which were discussed, as possible alternatives to Huawei were NEC Corp and Fujitsu Limited.

It would be pertinent to point out, that in recent months Britain has been aiming to strengthen trade ties with Japan, and is also looking to secure a Free Trade Agreement (FTA) with Japan. Both countries have also been at the forefront, of pitching for diversifying global supply chains.

Conclusion

While it remains to be seen whether Britain and Japan can work together for developing the former’s 5G network, the London-Tokyo relationship has witnessed an upswing in the aftermath of COVID19. Both countries have already begun to take steps for reducing economic reliance on China. It would be interesting to see, if Britain sticks to its announcement of removing Huawei from its 5g network by 2027, in case Donald Trump loses in 2020. While Britain is seeking to strengthen ties with country wary of China’s increasing economic dominance, the former would not likely to be perceived as a mere appendage of Washington.

 

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About the author

Tridivesh Singh Maini

Consulting Editor, Geopolitics with The Dispatch, Tridivesh Singh Maini is a New Delhi-based Policy Analyst. He is associated with The Jindal School of International Affairs, OP Jindal Global University, Sonepat, Haryana. He is a former SAV Visiting Fellow (Winter 2016) with the Stimson Centre, Washington DC. Mr Maini was also an Asia Society India-Pakistan Regional Young Leaders Initiative (IPRYLI) Fellow (2013-14), and a Public Policy Scholar with The Hindu Centre for Politics and Public Policy, Chennai (November 2013-March 2014). His research interests include; the role of Punjab in India-Pakistan ties, the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) and the changing nature of Indian federalism.