SKIMS scientist bags inaugural best paper award for influenza vaccine efficacy research
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SKIMS scientist bags inaugural best paper award for influenza vaccine efficacy research

SKIMS scientist bags inaugural best paper award for influenza vaccine efficacy research

SRINAGAR: Hyder Mir, Scientist ‘C’ at the Sheri Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences Soura has bagged the inaugural MENA-ISN Research Award for his research paper on influenza vaccine efficacy.

As per a SKIMS Soura spokesperson, Mir bagged the best research paper award for his paper titled ‘Poor Vaccine Effectiveness against Influenza B-Related Severe Acute Respiratory Infection in a Temperate North Indian State (2019-2020): A Call for further Data for Possible Vaccines with Closer Match’. He worked on the project titled ‘Global Influenza Hospital Surveillance Network’, the spokesperson added.

Mir will present his work at MENA-ISN Influenza Day 2022 on October 7th- 8th 2022 in Istanbul, Turkey and will receive a cash prize of Rs 2.5 lakh. He is the first international scientist to receive this award.

The work was conducted in Influenza Lab, SKIMS under the supervision of Director SKIMS, Dr Parvaiz A Koul and funded by GIHSN, Spain.

Director SKIMS congratulated Mir and said, “such acknowledgement at international level is a shot in the arm for researchers at SKIMS”. “Research is going to be the top priority in SKIMS,” Dr Koul said. (KDC)

 

 

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SKIMS scientist bags inaugural best paper award for influenza vaccine efficacy research